Monthly Archives: June 2017

5 Tips for Travel iPhone Photography

Brooklyn Bridge shot with an iPhone

Brooklyn Bridge

Summer travel is a perfect opportunity to use your iPhone or mobile camera for photography. Here are a few tips that might help you while traveling.

Limit Zoom

The zoom on an iPhone (not the iPhone Plus) is equal to a digital zoom. That means that it is not optically getting closer, just cropping in tighter. So, move closer to the subject! If you must crop in, do it in post processing for the sharpest image.

Person in subway

Slow Shutter App

Headphones

Your headphones are for more than just hearing. Did you know your headphone volume button triggers your shutter button? Many people push the round button on the iPhone screen to trigger the shutter, but this can cause camera shake. So, to get the best possible image, trigger the shutter with the headphone volume button. Using the headphones this way allows you to not appear to be taking photos. Hold the camera closer to the body and bystanders will see you playing with your phone not taking photos.

Angles

The mobile phone is so easy to view different angles, so get down low or raise it up high for a different perspective. A simple change can be from shooting the same subject horizontally versus vertically. Create completely different photos using perspective, work your subject and don’t settle on the first image.

NY ArchApps

There are so many wonderful apps for mobile photography and many are free. Two of my favorite free apps are Snapseed and Polarr. Both of these apps allow for global and selective adjustments from basic exposure to extensive filters. For artistic touches, the Glaze app offers great watercolor and sketching filters. Give them a try, a little post processing can add that extra touch.

Central Park

Central Park using Hipstamatic.

Backup

Now that you have some great photos, you need to back them up. Install the Google Photos App and your images back up automatically. Another option for Adobe CC users is Adobe Lightroom Mobile. From the mobile device, add a new importable folder from your camera’s camera roll. Then, the images captured on the phone add automatically to LR Mobile. Lastly, on your home computer under the collection “From LR Mobile,” view your cell phone images. Most importantly, find a system that works for you and get your phone photos backed up.

If you want a hands-on lesson on iPhoneography, sign up for a class at Arizona Highways Photo Workshops.

Posted in iPhone, Technology, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , |

My Backyard

Bug on dandelion

1/2000, f/2.8, ISO 200

A few months ago, I changed camera systems to an Olympus mirrorless camera (OMD1 Mark2) and I looked forward to spend quality time with my camera. Sometimes I think I need a grandiose trip for photography, but really all it takes is a location and some time. So, I spent a few hours in my backyard. Using only my 60mm macro lens and Vanguard Veo tripod I jumped in to capture the small details of my backyard. I didn’t find the best light, so I grabbed my diffuser for the overhead sun and in the afternoon clouds rolled in to diffuse the light.

Dandelions

Dandelions were the first item to photograph. The delicate details and proximity to the ground provided a great challenge with my new gear. I setup my tripod, camera and shutter release to find a small bug on one of the dandelions. I quickly adjusted my field of view and captured photos of this guy. With the camera on the tripod, one hand was free to hold a diffuser over the subject. This softened the light and gave me a more even exposure. After a few minutes, I removed the camera from the tripod and handheld a few shots. Of course, I switched the camera to burst mode. I prefer burst mode when handholding the camera because it increases my chance of sharp images in the case that I move while shooting the image. Next, I was in search of ladybugs.

Ladybug

1/1250, f/3.2, ISO 200

Ladybugs

Our plum trees were full of ladybugs. I did try the tripod, but the ladybugs moved so fast, I chose to handhold my camera instead. The focus point was a single point on the head and again I used burst mode to capture sharp images.

bumble bee

1/125, f/5.6, ISO 800

After ladybugs, I stuck with the bug theme and saw the bumblebees pollinating our chives. A handheld camera was again the best solution for these fast-moving insects. Luckily, the clouds rolled in which provided soft even light. I knelt on the ground and kept moving with the bees until I got several photos that pleased me. My favorite image was when the bumble bee looked straight at me! Now, I find myself checking out my yard several times a week looking for other things to shoot. A few days ago, I noticed bees pollinating our red hot pokers so I got out there and captured more images. If you are ready for a photo project, just get out in your own backyard. It is important that you have fun and spend time with your camera.

Posted in Inspiration, Photographic Techniques Tagged , , , |